BROKEN EMPIRE EXHIBITIONS IN GERMANY

January / 01 / 2004

BROKEN EMPIRE EXHIBITIONS IN GERMANY

Russia will be this year’s guest nation at the world’s largest book fair in Frankfurt, Germany. This resurging interest in Russia has led to three exhibitions of photographs by Gerd Ludwig.

As a highlight of the 10th annual literature festival, Berleburger Literaturpflaster, the photo exhibit RUSSLAND – EINE WELTMACHT IM WANDEL (English title: Broken Empire – After the Fall of the USSR) will be shown from October 2nd through November 2nd at the Museum in Bad Berleburg (Goetheplatz 3). The opening speech will be given by Christiane Gehner of Der Spiegel and Chair of the Art Society Glückstadt.

An exhibit with the same title will be presented by National Geographic Germany in conjunction with the German-Russian Society in Münster, Germany (Lichthof im Landeshaus des Landschaftsverbandes Westfalen-Lippe’, Freiherr vom Stein Platz 1).

This show will run from October 8th through October 30th. Ina Ruck, news anchor for the German ARD-TV network, will be the opening speaker.

Following Berleburg, RUSSLAND – EINE WELTMACHT IM WANDEL (Broken Empire – After the Fall of the USSR) will then travel to Stuttgart, Germany and open in the renowned vhs photogallery (Stuttgart Rotebühlplatz 8). The show will be exhibited from November 26th, 2003 through January 25th, 2004. Christiane Gehner of Der Spiegel and Chair of the Art Society Glückstadt will be the opening speaker.

All photographs to be exhibited are from Gerd Ludwig’s book, Broken Empire – After the Fall of the USSR published by National Geographic in English, German and Korean. The 126 stunning images collected in the book focus on the dramatic changes affecting the Former Soviet Union since the end of communism and capture many moods: the brash, glitzy whirl of a ballroom, where fresh-minted capitalists flaunt their success; and the gray despair of a street market, where the poor hawk meager possessions to buy a meal. On one page, a group of elderly babushkas clutch candles at the blessing of a well, once again openly celebrating their faith; on the next, the suffering face of a young radiation victim displays the heartbreaking price of nuclear might. Every image adds a new piece to the eternal puzzle called Russia, by turns greedy and generous, stoic and exuberant, suspicious and yet sympathetic.

 

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